Tag Archives: chlorine

NON-POLAR BOND

In a Non polar Covalent Bond, atoms share their electrons equally. That happens when, they have the same electronegativity or the same electron affinity. The best examples for this  kind of bonds are molecules created through the union of atoms of the same element, as in H2, N2, O2, Cl2  

When non-polar molecules interact among them, there are negligible forces of attraction, and they remain as individual molecules, that means these substances are gases.

In our environment we have these substances in the Air, which has approximately the following composition, 78% of N2, 21% of O2, 0.9% Ar (noble gas)

 

 

COVALENT BOND

Covalent bonds involve the sharing of electrons by two atoms, in contrast to the transfer of electrons in Ionic Bonds.

Covalent Bond is another way to create a noble gas configuration for each atom. For example, Hydrogen has 1 electron, and needs another to have the same electronic configuration as gas noble Helium. Chloride, has 7 electrons, and with one more acquire the distribution of Argon.
However, when H-Cl bond is formed, there is still an unequal sharing of the electrons, because the electrons spend more time around the more nonmetallic atom, and more electronegative, in this case the Chloride, giving us a Polar Covalent Bond.
In a Polar Covalent Bond there is an atom being slightly more positive (H) than the other (Cl), i.e., the bond will produce a dipole moment, which can be evident when many H-Cl molecules interact among them, because the positive extreme of one molecule will be attracted by the negative part of the other. producing, in most of the cases, liquid substances. The most popular compound with Polar Covalent Bond is Water, where the Oxygen is the slightly negative extreme of the molecule.

IONIC BOND

CHEMICAL BONDING

Atoms in our planet are not by themselves, they are joined at least to another atom through a chemical bond. Bonds allow atoms achieve a stable electron configuration, similar as the noble gases, which are mostly not joined to other atoms.

The more important kind of bonds are Ionic and Covalent.

Ionic Bond

Is formed between atoms from the groups IA, IIA (metals) and VIA, VIIA (non metals). In this bond,  metals donate one or more electrons to the non-metals leading to form ions, one of them positively charged (cation) and the other with negative charge (anion).

For example, common table salt is Sodium Chloride. When Sodium (Na) and Chlorine (Cl) are combined, the sodium atoms lose an electron, forming cations (Na+), and the chlorine atoms gain an electron to form anions (Cl).

Na + Cl =  Na+ + Cl = NaCl 

Most of the Ionic compounds in our planet are in the solid state and form lattice structures. The two principal factors in determining the form of the lattice are the charge of the ions and their sizes.